Skip navigation to content

Picture this…

Project Juno win for School of Physics & Astronomy

Monday 13 February 2017

juno-champion-new-potw

Congratulations to the School of Physics & Astronomy on achieving champion status in the Project Juno initiative. The scheme, presented by the Institute of Physics (IoP), recognises and rewards action to address the under-representation of women in universities.

To become a Juno Champion, a department, institute or group must show that it has embedded the five principles for Project Juno:

  • appointment and selection,
  • career promotion and progression,
  • departmental culture and work allocation
  • and flexible working practices.

There must also be a framework in place to deliver equality of opportunity and reward.

Head of School Professor Graham Turnbull said: “We are delighted to receive the Juno Champion award from the Institute of Physics. Since becoming a Juno practitioner in 2013, the school has worked hard to deliver on our goals for equality of opportunity and reward for all staff and students.

“Our percentages of female staff and students currently exceed the national averages for physics and astronomy, and we are committed to building on our Champion award to further improve our positive working environment for all, and to continuing to address the under-representation of women in the physical sciences.”

Jenni Dyer, head of diversity at the IOP, added: “The Institute is really pleased that the University of St Andrews has become the third Juno Champion in Scotland and has brought the total number of Juno Champions to 17. They have worked tirelessly to embed gender equality into their physics environments and we congratulate all those involved in this achievement. Project Juno continues to deliver real results, demonstrating the efforts that physics departments are taking to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to succeed.”

For more information on Project Juno and to find out which “small changes can make a big difference” to the future of female physicists, watch the Becoming a Juno Champion video on the IoP website.

Picture this…

...joining our award-winning young team of Estates apprentices.

Wednesday 22 February 2017

apprentices-potw

Seven new positions are available for the University’s four-year training programme, which is open to 16 to 24 year olds from within a 20 mile radius of St Andrews.

Apprentices benefit from working with experienced and highly skilled members of the University’s Estates team, with additional placements at local colleges as block release students.

This year marks a decade since the University's first modern apprenticeship scheme was established, with 17 young people successfully passing through the initiative since its inception in 2007.

The new recruits will learn a wide range of skills in traditional trades alongside fellow apprentices and skilled colleagues working in 147 mediaeval and modern buildings across the University estate.

There will be an open information session on Wednesday 22 February between 6pm and 8pm in Parliament Hall, South Street, St Andrews.

Further details and application packs for all positions are available online - interested applicants that can't make it to the open session can call 01334 462571 for more information.

Some of our current Estates apprentices (pictured left to right: Andrew Thomson, Sam Shepherd, Blair Thomson and Jamie Todd) all received external accolades for their hard work last year.

Read more on our press release page.

Picture this…

Project Juno win for School of Physics & Astronomy

Monday 13 February 2017

juno-champion-new-potw

Congratulations to the School of Physics & Astronomy on achieving champion status in the Project Juno initiative. The scheme, presented by the Institute of Physics (IoP), recognises and rewards action to address the under-representation of women in universities.

To become a Juno Champion, a department, institute or group must show that it has embedded the five principles for Project Juno:

  • appointment and selection,
  • career promotion and progression,
  • departmental culture and work allocation
  • and flexible working practices.

There must also be a framework in place to deliver equality of opportunity and reward.

Head of School Professor Graham Turnbull said: “We are delighted to receive the Juno Champion award from the Institute of Physics. Since becoming a Juno practitioner in 2013, the school has worked hard to deliver on our goals for equality of opportunity and reward for all staff and students.

“Our percentages of female staff and students currently exceed the national averages for physics and astronomy, and we are committed to building on our Champion award to further improve our positive working environment for all, and to continuing to address the under-representation of women in the physical sciences.”

Jenni Dyer, head of diversity at the IOP, added: “The Institute is really pleased that the University of St Andrews has become the third Juno Champion in Scotland and has brought the total number of Juno Champions to 17. They have worked tirelessly to embed gender equality into their physics environments and we congratulate all those involved in this achievement. Project Juno continues to deliver real results, demonstrating the efforts that physics departments are taking to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to succeed.”

For more information on Project Juno and to find out which “small changes can make a big difference” to the future of female physicists, watch the Becoming a Juno Champion video on the IoP website.